Folding Your Outdoor Jacket: A Neat Trick

by Paul Kirtley

I like to be organised with my outdoor clothing and equipment. I also like to keep things neat and tidy, with minimal extraneous kit to do a job. I suspect you are similar.

These days you can get some very lightweight stuff-sacs and packing systems but the lightest packing system remains no packing system at all.

Here is a neat trick to pack your outdoor jacket so it stays tidy and takes up less room in your rucksack.

This method only takes a few seconds and helps keep you organised while out and about.

Step 1: Lay Out Your Outdoor Jacket

Norrona Recon Jacket Laid Out Ready for Folding

Lay out your jacket ready for folding. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Step: 2: Fold in the Arms of Your Jacket

Folding an arm of the outdoor jacket

Fold in an arm of the jacket. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Folding in the Other Side of the Waterproof Jacket

Fold in the other arm so that the body of the jacket forms a rectangle. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Norrona Recon Jacket neatly folded ready for rolling

Jacket arms folded in and ready for the next step. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Step 3: Fold and Roll the Body of the Jacket

Folding up the lower half of the jacket towards the upper half

Fold up the lower half of the jacket towards the upper half. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Rolling up the folded Jacket towards the hood

Once the body of the jacket is folded in half, roll it up towards the hood. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Norrona Recon Jacket Folded and Rolled, Ready to Pack into Hood

Your jacket should now be rolled up and look something like this. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Step 4: Pack the Body of the Jacket Into the Hood

Packing the outdoor jacket into its own hood

Hold the hood open and place one side of the rolled body into it. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Tuck the body of the outdoor jacket neatly into its hood

Tuck the other side of body neatly into the hood. Photo: Paul Kirtley

Norrona Recon Gore-Tex Jacket neatly packed into its own hood

Once the body of the jacket is in the hood, it forms a neat package. Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Step 5: Stow Your Jacket Neatly

Jacket is now a self-contained unit.

The jacket is now a self-contained unit that can be neatly packed away. No stuffacs or packing systems required! Photo: Amanda Quaine.

Folding Breathable Membranes

This method can be used to fold and stow cotton smocks, or Ventile, Gore-tex, Event and similar material jackets. It works with heavyweight jackets such as the Swazi Tahr and Norrona Recon (used in the pics above) as well as lightweight mountain jackets such as the RAB Super Dru. It also works with softshell jackets.

Please note: Repeated folding of breathable membranes such as Gore-Tex or Event in exactly the same place can weaken the membrane there. So it is best not to make the folds in your jacket too sharp or to fold each time in exactly the same place. Just fold loosely as in the pics above and you'll be fine.

A Final Tip on Zips

You may have noticed the zip of the jacket in the photos above wasn't done up. I always pack my jackets with the zip open. This means if I'm cold and or need to put on my jacket quickly, I don't have to fiddle getting the zip open first. This doesn't sound much but if your fingers are cold, it can make a big difference to how quickly you get inside your jacket.

If you like this please click the 'like' button below or leave a quick comment.

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Paul Kirtley is owner and Chief Instructor of Frontier Bushcraft. He has had a lifelong passion for the great outdoors and gains great satisfaction from helping others enjoy it too. Paul writes the UK's leading bushcraft blog as well as for various publications including The Bushcraft Journal and Bushcraft & Survival Skills Magazine.

 

{ 78 comments… read them below or add one }

Par

This is a neat trick (I learnt it decades ago and with the old Swedish army raincoat).

For garments with no hood I simply fold them in thirds lenght-wise, fold the bottom double (say 20-25 cm), and then roll/fold the rest of the garment from the other end. The folded up bottom end forms a pocket, jut like you use the hood. I have used the same techniqe for small tarps, groundsheets, etc. Even plastic bags from the grocery store gets this treatment.

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Paul Kirtley

Hej Par!

Yes, yesterday someone told me that this trick is in the Swedish army manual. That’s not where I learned it from but I suspect the person who showed me learned it from that source.

Thanks for the extra info. It sounds like you have the most organised grocery store bags of anyone I know! πŸ™‚

All the best,

Paul

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Hans

See http://www.soldf.com/regnstall90.html place for the folding instructions for Swedish army way. especially note that the way the pants are folded up inside the jacket. There is a additional trick to it, by leaving the ends of the rainpantΒ΄s belt outside hood, You can wear the whole thing as a hip pack.

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Paul Kirtley

Thanks for the link Hans.

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Joep

Nice trick πŸ™‚ When you are wearing more modern and lightweight fabrics, most of the time it is also possible you “fold” your jacket of rain pants inside a side pocket.

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Paul Kirtley

Hey Joep

Good to hear from you. Yes, the very lightweight jackets and trousers available today seem to pack down to almost nothing. Great for very lightweight hiking, etc.

All the best,

Paul

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Duane

Have folded jackets exactly the same way for years, can’t remember where i learnt it now. The same teqnique works well for jackets without hoods, just tie a string round them or use an elastic band, keeps the jacket nice and small in your pack πŸ™‚

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Paul Kirtley

Hi Duane

Thanks for your comment. Yep, I’m the same – I can’t help keeping everything folded and organised. I tend to roll up waterproof trousers and use elastic bands, rather than include them with the jacket (as I use jackets much more often than overtrousers). I find the elastic bands keep the trousers packed small.

All the best,

Paul

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Ray

I made a larger paracord bracelet which I use to keep my jacket attached to the outside of my bag when I am not wearing it, never seen this method before but I will be using it from now on.

Ray

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Paul Kirtley

Hi Ray

I’m glad you found this useful. Works in town too! πŸ™‚

All the best,

Paul

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MARK STANDEN

good tip = all tips are good if they save time, effort and space . keep them coming. thanks

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Mark

There’ll be some more tips & tricks coming. Glad you liked this one.

All the best,

Paul

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Elen Sentier

Yay, it’s a good tip … Dad taught me to do that back in the last century and I still find it works :-), most of the time.

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Paul Kirtley

The tried and tested tips are usually the best πŸ™‚

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hedgey

Nice trick Paul, i do the same, it then lives in the top pocket of my rucksack until its needed, wish i could do the same with my thick warm fleece jacket.
All the best
HEDGEY

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Paul Kirtley

Hi Hedgey

Good to hear I’m in good company.

I have another trick for packing bulky warm layers such as fleeces and duvet jackets – watch this space! πŸ™‚

All the best,

Paul

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John Hands

That’s a canny way to fold up kit, keep up the good work.

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Paul Kirtley

Thanks John. We’ll do our best!

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Simon Briggs

Wow, nice one. A surprisingly simple, but effective and useful tip which I will certainly use myself. Thanks and keep the tips coming!
Simon

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Paul Kirtley

Hi Simon,

Glad you like it. I think you’ll find lots of uses for this tip and others we have in store.

All the best,

Paul

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Adrian Boots

I think the hints and tips idea is great – keep them coming! Best of luck with it all Paul!!

Take care,

Adrian

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Adrian

It’s good to hear from you. Thanks for your comment and support πŸ™‚

Best wishes,

Paul

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Dave Cohen

Allways nice to get these tip reminders paul. Keeps one from becoming sloppy! Great stuff. Keep them them coming!

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Paul Kirtley

Thanks Dave. I’ll do my best πŸ™‚

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gregorio capra

exellent input,just tested it with warm jacket it works a treat !
that will come handy on the next mountain marathon were I need to go ultralight!

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Paul Kirtley

Hi Greg,

Good to hear from you. I’m pleased you’ll be able to put this to practical use and apply it to what you are doing. I suspect the navigation training has also come in useful for your mountain marathons?

All the best,

Paul

Reply

Chrissy Blakeman

Hi Paul .. You taught me this method on one of your bushcraft events and it made such a difference.

It worked really well .. was so much easier to pack away into my rucksack and I was better organised for it …. ‘It’s the little things ….’ and I still do it!

Chrissy

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Paul Kirtley

Hi Chrissy,

Lovely to hear from you. I’m glad you remembered this πŸ™‚ It is indeed the little things…

All the best,

Paul

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Dave

Great technic Paul, this would work great for a Poncho as well.

Cheers,
Dave.

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Paul Kirtley

Hi Dave,

Let us know if it works with your poncho.

Cheers,

Paul

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Nige

Top tip Paul, just tried it one of my goretex jackets on the living room floor…brilliant, so easy. Usually roll them up, but never got packed so small and neat!

Cheers
Nige.

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Paul Kirtley

Good stuff Nige. You’ll be applying it to all sorts of garments before you know it… πŸ™‚

Cheers,

Paul

Reply

David

Hi Nige,

good way to fold your jacket for packing. sometimes if Im not packing it away but carrying it, I keep the sleeves out and use them to wrap around my waist like a belt.

Thanks

David

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Paul Kirtley

Good extra tip David. Thanks.

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Mark H

Another top tip – just tried it on my Tahr, works a treat. Thank you Paul.

Best

Mark

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hey Mark

No worries. Glad you found it useful.

ATB

Paul

Reply

Curlysue

Thanks for the tip.

Reply

Tim Weyman

Folding can be fun πŸ™‚

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUZfsohErgY

It’s odd how being able to do this and make a t towel chicken can entertain people for ages…no really it can πŸ™‚

Tim

Reply

Alan

Great tip Paul,have since rolled my jacket in that manner, great for us interested and enthusiastic novices,just like to thank you and your team for the best Good Friday ever.
Best Wishes and Kind Regards
Alan Reade

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Alan,

Good to hear from you. It was great to meet you on the Bushcraft Essentials Course. We really enjoyed teaching you and your group. Everyone was so enthusiastic and the whole group got on so well. I think you all got a huge amount from the course as a result πŸ™‚

I’m glad that our tips and tricks are continuing to help you out too.

Keep in touch.

Warm regards,

Paul.

Reply

DaveBromley

This is simple but effective, Bushcraft in a nutshell

Dave

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Simple and effective – just like your comment! Thanks Dave

Reply

Carl

Thanks!
Will pass that tip onto our Scouts.

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Paul Kirtley

Great! You’re very welcome Carl πŸ™‚

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Roberta Spencer

Glad to see you use your common sense welcome at mine any time – Thanks X

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Paul Kirtley

Thanks Roberta πŸ™‚

Reply

the interceptor boy

nice neat trick, Paul, you can also secure the jacket once folded with the elastic cord on the back of the hood.
cheers the interceptor boy.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Interceptor Boy,

Yep, that’s a good additional tip. Henry on the Frontier team attaches his jacket to his belt that way.

Cheers,

Paul

Reply

Pat

That looks like a handy way of stowing my smock until its needed. I normally strap it to the back of my pack but I will give this way a go. As usual keep up the good work I think all the articles are great and I try to pass them on to cubs with an interest in the outdoors.

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Pat,

Thanks for your comment. I hope you find this one useful. Some people I’ve shown this to personally tend to pack absolutely everything they can like this now. It tidies up your packing for a trip so much…

All the best,

Paul

Reply

Adrian Bell

Finally a good use for built in hoods ! I’ve just re-proofed all my jackets, when they’re dry I’ll give it a go. Thank Q

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Adrian,

I’m glad you liked this idea. I hope it works well for you.

All the best,

Paul

Reply

Steve Colsell

As a complete novice to Bushcraft, but knowing the challenge of maintaining an organised rucksack, I thought this was great little tip. The black art of effective packing for a day in the woods is something I’d love more hints and tips on. Thanks Paul!

Reply

Paul Kirtley

Hi Steve,

Good to hear from you. I’m glad you found tip one useful. I’ll see what else I can pull out to the bag πŸ˜‰

All the best,

Paul

Reply

Jim

Neat & tidy! We can learn a lot from the military. We learned to make angles in our sheets to make a nice tight bed and I use this technique today to fold Tyvek sheet over my bedroll and it works like magic. Just do it backwards and seal the sides with tarp clips. Any tips on spices to take out in the woods?

Reply

Rody Klop

Good trick. I seldom use it though, mostly in the summer. Use a cord with 2 loops and carry it as a roll.

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Albara

you are awesome! saved me lots of space, Thanks!

Reply

Paul Kirtley

My pleasure Albara. Glad it was useful!

All the best,

Paul

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Bill Jackson

I particularly like the suggestion of packing the jacket open and ready to wear, no fumbling with frozen fingers.
In general it’s important to keep things stowed in an organized and consistent way.
I just did four days on the alpine ridges of Strathcona Park, Vancouver Island, Canada, where the weather can be fairly dramatic. Am currently reconsidering my gear arrangements, so your tip was very timely for me.

Reply

Vincent

Great idea with the jacket, saves tying it round your waist.
Keep the tips coming Paul

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Paul Kirtley

Will do Vincent. Thanks for the feedback πŸ™‚

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Melissa Nadin

Great tip, will know for future reference.

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Paul Kirtley

Glad it was useful πŸ™‚

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Hampton

Neat trick I’ll be sure to use it for my next trip

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Paul Kirtley

Glad you liked it! πŸ™‚

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Cyril Flannigan

Great tip, simple and useful ….
Thanks Paul πŸ™‚

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Jim

Hi Paul,
A great tip indeed, nice use of the hood! I saw something similar to what Par mentioned on Youtube as well for other garments. It’s how I pack all my clothes now. Get them rectangular (or near enough) fold up the hem 25-50mm (1″-2″ for the non-metric folk) roll-up towards the hem and the fold the outside bit of the hem over to close up the parcel. Works a treat. Here’s another tip, if you pack a change of footwear; camp slippers or whatever, roll up your spare socks and put them in the other shoes.

Reply

Trevor

Great tips. Very similar to how I was shown in the service.
Keep up the work as many folks starting out in the outdoors can learn from them.

Reply

Sean

I love this tip, pretty much turns any hooded jacket into a “pack a mac”.

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Barry Dutton

I do this sort of thing sometimes, but not all the time. I am not as organized as you but recently I watched a YT video by the Appalachian Yoda (that is what I call him lol, he likes it) — Dave at ReallyBigMoneky1 — you likely know of him. He is VERY smart outdoorsy and making gear wise. He made similar points to not folding sharp corner or using the same creases/fold points to certain gear I had not thought of — but which makes sense.

— So if you and him both say it, of course it is true! (: ATB man. Did you notice any traffic in terms of me sharing your post on Linked In recently? I tried to do something different, like I said, nothing ever shared of bushcraft there on LI before. Just curious. I know you get hits every day from all over.

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Dave H.

Hi Paul thanks for another useful tip on clothes storage. I used a similar method, using the hood of the coat in more of a sack shape with my over-trousers and gloves in the hood too. your method looks a lot flatter. I always try to roll my other clothes as they stay neater and, as you said, avoids damaging treated or “Gortex” fabrics. All the best love the tips and tricks.
Keep safe and sharing, Dave.

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Nick

Hi Paul

Great little tip this! I’ve been doing this for many years and always helps to keep the rucksack neatly packed. Like you, I did my MLS, as well as many years of D of E, PTV, Mountaneering & camping. In 35 yrs I still do this and it helps so much when you need to get your coat and other layers out quickly!

Really appreciate your blogs and videos & look forward to meeting up in the future to experience a truly beneficial course in Bushcraft & Woodmanship.

Very best to you & yours
Nick

Reply

Ian

Very simple and effective

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Paul Kirtley

The best things often are πŸ™‚

Glad you like it Ian.

Warm regards,

Paul

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Jonathan

It’s many small incremental steps like this that add up to make a huge difference.
Thanks for a great tip

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Paul Kirtley

Indeed Jonathan. Very well put. The difference is in the detail πŸ™‚

Warm regards,

Paul

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Stephen Tomlinson

A timely tip Paul as I’m packing for a three month trip to Spain & Portugal! Look forward to reading and watching the blogs and posts. The on line course has proved really good too, both for the information and as a refresher tool. Keep up the good work!

Reply

John carragher

Hi Paul,
Very useful tip packs away very compact neat in the rucksack .
Many thanks,
John

Reply

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